Author: Kate Griffin


Explainer Floating icons of official national flags of the world

The Kyoto Protocol made history in 1997 as the first major international effort to slow climate change.

Explainer Photo of parched landscape with sparse vegetation. Gully erosion, the most common form of soil erosion, has formed channels in the land

Soil erosion is a serious environmental problem in South Africa, affecting both land and water resources.

Explainer Photograph of a river where the water has an orange/red colour because of high iron content

The link between coal, gas and water pollution is clear, but the extraction and use of fossil fuels affect ecosystems in many less obvious ways as well.

Explainer Close-up of the charging point in an electric car with the charger plugged in

To boost the uptake of electric vehicles in South Africa, we need measures to make going electric a more attractive option for motorists.

Explainer Aerial photograph of an electric vehicle driving on a one-track road with fields either side and a farmhouse or barn in the distance.

Running an electric car saves money long term, and it also means being less vulnerable to temporary price spikes and shortages of petrol and diesel.

Explainer Aerial view of World's End, Blyde River Canyon

South Africa is experiencing a number of environmental issues, including global warming, pollution and species loss.

Explainer Stock photo of a green plant growing out of a jar of money, to symbolise renewable energy funds

Renewable energy funds are a vital tool for South Africa’s green energy transition. They can pay for everything from infrastructure upgrades to mine rehabilitation.

Explainer

“There are no jobs on a dead planet!” goes the old slogan. Environmental degradation is a serious risk to economic growth.